How does former Louisiana Ragin' Cajun catcher Jonathan Lucroy fit with the Oakland A's?

A native of Eustis, Florida, Lucroy inked a one-year, $6.5 million free agent contract with the A's on Saturday.

I think it's a perfect match.

Oakland, who doesn't have a big spending budget, gets a top-tier guy at his position for a cheap price, while Lucroy gets an opportunity to build back up his resume, and maybe get a multi-year deal next offseason.

The 31-year old Lucroy was the top catcher available on the open market this offseason, and the A's needed a catcher.

Oakland has Bruce Maxwell, who has some off the field issues, and Josh Phegley, who has struggled since his strong rookie season in 2015.

Also, for an A's starting rotation, whose oldest expected member will be 27, veteran leadership behind the plate is ideal.

If Oakland contends in the AL West, then great. If they don't, and Lucroy is playing well, he becomes a valuable trade chip come the summer.

Even if Lucroy doesn't rebound in 2018, it's only a one-year deal.

It's almost a no-lose situation for the A's.

A member of the UL baseball squad from 2005-2007, before being drafted by the Milwaukee Brewers in the third round of the 2007 amateur entry draft, Lucroy, a two-time National League All-Star selection (2014 & 2016), began last season with the Texas Rangers, before being traded to the Colorado Rockies in late July.

Last season, with the Rangers, was a disappointment for Lucroy, hitting only a .242 with 4 home runs and 27 runs batted in, before bouncing back a little, hitting a .310 with 2 homers and 13 RBI's over the final two months with the Rockies.

So, between stints in Texas and Colorado last season, Lucroy hit a .265, to go along with 6 homers and 40 RBI's.

After hitting 24 homers in 2016, Lucroy's drop in power numbers is a little concerning. As a matter of fact, the drop in power likely cost Lucroy a multi-year deal, even in a year when the market was almost non-existent.

I'm looking for Lucroy to hit in he middle of the Oakland batting order, have a bounce-back season, and make up some of this year's lost money on next year's free agent market