I think we've all said it at least once, "I need a break". In this fast paced, getting faster, world that we live in time off is now at a premium. Gone are the days of "I will call you tomorrow" or "I will take care of it after lunch". With today's modern technology "now" is the only time you have to work and "now" never seems to go away.

Researchers found that because of technology even weekends don't satisfy the body and mind's desire to decompress from work. With e-mail, text messaging, and instant access via mobile phone, the office is always in your pocket. The response always seems to be needed immediately.

Those scientist who study people like you and I  have discovered that when we don't take a day away from work bad things begin to happen. Those who neglect taking time off after an average of 62 days are prone to become more aggressive at work. They are also likely to develop very real physical symptoms such as body aches, pains, and even migraine headaches.

Other symptoms of not taking that needed break include difficulty sleeping and even depression. While the decision to choose to work is a personal one, there is often resentment from those who don't directed toward those who do. This creates tension in the workplace and makes for a less than productive environment.

Many of us receive personal time off as part of our employment agreement. The interesting part of that is that only 55% of us actually use all of our allotted time. Based on this research about half of the people around you could snap at any minute. You could be one of those people too.

According to reports 62 days does seem to be the average limit when it comes to burn out in the workplace. That means about every three months, for your own good, you should take a personal day.

During that day you shouldn't check e-mail, you shouldn't take text messages,and you should not return phone calls. While it might seem counter productive on the next day back at the office,the change it will do your mind and body will more than make up for the more than 100 e-mails you should have returned yesterday.