A state Department of Wildlife and Fisheries biologist says they are receiving an increase in calls from the public who are concerned about foxes near their home.

Melissa Collins says it is normal to see foxes in urban areas. Collins says it’s unlikely they will attack humans and they tend to stay away from pets.

“Pets are generally safe, if you have a very small dog it’s likely they could be interested in them but more often than not they will eat insects, rats, mice, squirrels.”

LDWF is holding an informational meeting tonight in Lafayette on urban foxes and nuisance wildlife control. Collins says these foxes are attracted to fruits and vegetables, which is important to know if you have a garden. She says it is likely people can expect to continue to see an increase in the fox population.

“As these homes and subdivisions spread out, suburbia grows larger, it sort of encroaches on their habitat so we’re forced to interact so we’ll certainly see increases over time.”

Collins says if you come across a fox in your neighborhood, be cautious, but these animals usually don’t come up humans. She says do not to feed them, because many times that tempts them to stay close to your home.

“For the most part there is no reason to be fearful of them. If you don’t want them there are things that you can do to keep them away, we always recommend that people use motion sensor sprinklers.”