'Tis the season of giving ... people your opinion on which is better real or artificial Christmas trees.

The tree going up is usually the first sign that Christmas is coming. Some people go out every year and chop down the perfect tree, while others drag theirs out of the attic when the time is right. I say whichever tree makes you feel merry and bright is the right choice, it doesn't matter if it's real or fake. They all look the same once they are covered in lights and ornaments anyways.

But which tree is the most environmentally friendly choice? The New York Times took a look at some of the most common misconceptions when it comes to the greener way to deck the halls this holiday season.

Let's break it down.

Real: 

Cutting down a Christmas tree is not bad for the environment. The trees come from farms and are not taken from the wild. Tree farms are actually beneficial to the environment and provide clean air, watersheds and habitats for wildlife.

According to The New York Times, "the greenest real tree is the one that's bought locally". Buying a tree every year helps the local economy and minimizes car emissions from transport. Plus, when Christmas is all said and done you can take down your tree and recycle it.

Fake:

Have a green Christmas year after year by pulling your artificial tree out of the attic. Studies have shown that the environmental impact of a fake tree is actually lower than a real tree if you use it for 5 years or more.

The New York Times added that by reusing your tree you are keeping plastic out of landfills, which benefits the preservation of farmlands and even has a positive impact on local jobs.

To tree, or not to tree, that is the question. So, which is the greener choice? Both. It all depends on you.

"There is no such thing as a bad Christmas tree" and in the scheme of things the tree has an extremely small impact on the environment compared to everything else that makes up the holiday season.

If you are looking to celebrate the holidays in a truly environmental fashion be sure to reuse your fake tree, recycle your real tree and decorate your tree with LED lights, which save energy.

You can dive a little deeper into the great Christmas tree debate by checking out The New York Times full article.