ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — The Latest on what appears to be an attempted military coup in Turkey (all times local):

1:40 a.m.

Turkish news agency Dogan has reported that soldiers have opened fired on people trying to cross Istanbul's Bosporus bridge in protest of the attempted coup, and some have been wounded.

TV footage showed people running for cover as shots rang out. Earlier, a statement attributed to the military said that Turkish armed forces have "fully seized control" of the country.

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan then called on citizens to take to the streets in a show of support for the government.


1:35 a.m.

Turkey's Istanbul-based first army commander says the soldiers involved in an attempted coup "represent a small group" and "there is no cause for concern," according to the state-run Anadolu Agency.

An earlier statement attributed to the military said that Turkish armed forces have "fully seized control" of the country.

But First Army Commander Umit Dundar told Anadolu that "we are working to solve the problem here. They represent a small group within the First Army Command. There is no cause for concern. We are taking the necessary precautions with (soldiers) who have not joined them and remain within the military chain of command."

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has called on citizens to take to the streets in a show of support for the government.


1:30 a.m.

Turkish Interior Minister Efkan Ala says very effective units from the chief of general staff's office, the Turkish armed forces and the police are responding to the attempted coup in the country.

Ala says they are responding to "gangs who have taken cover in certain locations."

He spoke by telephone to NTV television and also encouraged Turkish citizens to "fearlessly go out and support our security forces."

He says: "We think it would be right for them to go out to the airports, to the streets, especially to the main arteries. As long as they do that this gang's attempts... they will be defeated no matter what."

He added "this is a gang that considers nothing sacred, not the people or the nation. They're taking certain actions."


1:15 a.m.

NATO hasn't responded immediately to a request for comment on how alliance operations or Turkey's status might be affected after the military said it seized control of the country.

Independent observers noted that the 1949 treaty that created the U.S. alliance has no mechanism for suspending members, unlike the United Nations, the European Union or the Organization of American States.

Nothing in NATO's founding 1949 Washington Treaty says anything about intervening in the internal or political affairs of an alliance member, and Turkey kept its NATO membership following past military coups.

The treaty's key clause, Article 5, stipulates that NATO member states agree that "an armed attack against one or more of them in Europe or North America shall be considered an attack against them all," but that language has taken to apply to an external enemy.


1:10 a.m.

Loud explosions have been heard in Turkey's capital Ankara and CNN-Turk reports an explosion occurred at the state-run television building.

Turkey's state-run news agency report military helicopters have also attacked the headquarters of TURKSAT satellite station on the outskirts of Ankara and the Ankara Police headquarters.

Dozens of tanks were seen moving toward a palace that is now used by the prime minister and deputy prime ministers. A civilian car tried to stop one of the tanks, but it rammed through the vehicle as those in the car escaped.


12:50 a.m.

Turkey's president has urged citizens to take to the streets in a show of support for the government after the military said it seized full control of the country.

Recep Tayyip Erdogan, speaking to CNN-Turk through FaceTime, called the actions by the military "an attempt at an uprising by a minority within our armed forces."

The president's office refused to disclose Erdogan's whereabouts, saying he was at a secure location. Erdogan said "I don't believe this coup attempt will be successful."

Erdogan added: "There is absolutely no chain of command here. Right now the chain of command has been put on hold."


12:35 a.m.

The White House says President Barack Obama has been briefed on developments in key NATO ally Turkey where the military claims to have seized power in a coup.

The National Security Council said Obama had been apprised of Friday "unfolding situation" in Turkey and would continue to get regular updates.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry says he hopes for stability and continuity in Turkey following the reports.

Kerry, in Moscow for talks with Russian officials on Syria on Friday, told reporters he didn't have details of the situation rapidly unfolding on the ground in Turkey and said it would be "inappropriate" to comment on developments. But, he expressed hope that the key ally and strategically important member of the coalition fighting the Islamic State would remain at peace.


12:25 a.m.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and other Russian officials have called on their countrymen in Turkey to stay indoors amid uncertainty about whether a military coup is taking place.

Lavrov made the statement early Saturday at a news conference with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry. However, Lavrov, who had been in lengthy talks with Kerry, said he had little information about what was taking place in Turkey.

Russia's tourism authority issued a similar warning. Turkey had long been a popular vacation destination for Russians, but the numbers dropped sharply last year when Russia banned package tours to Turkey amid tensions over Turkey shooting down a Russian warplane and it was unclear how many Russians currently are in the country.


12:20 a.m.

A Turkish military statement read on state TRT television says the military has seized power, citing rising autocratic rule and increased terrorism.

But CNN-Turk has quoted Defense Minister Fikri Isik as describing it as a "pirate statement."

Earlier, another statement published by the private Dogan news agency says that the military has "fully seized control" of the country.


11:45 p.m.

A Turkish news agency has published a statement from the military saying the armed forces have "fully seized control" of the country.

The Dogan agency reported that the statement said that the military did this "to reinstall the constitutional order, democracy, human rights and freedoms, to ensure that the rule of law once again reigns in the country, for the law and order to be reinstated."

The military statement went on to say that "all international agreements and commitments will remain. We pledge that good relations with all world countries will continue."


11:10 p.m.

Turkey's prime minister says a group within Turkey's military has engaged in what appeared to be an attempted coup.

Binali Yildirim told NTV television: "it is correct that there was an attempt."

Yildirim didn't provide details, but said Turkey would never allow any "initiative that would interrupt democracy."

Earlier, military jets were heard flying over the capital, Ankara.

Media reports said ambulances were seen in front of the Turkey's military headquarters.


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