Over the next four to five days, Acadiana is expected to get some serious rainfall from Hurricane Harvey. As a result, we can expect our bayous and ditches to fill, and get standing water under and around our homes. This is the perfect recipe for you to meet a snake. By meet a snake, I mean freak out and have a mild heart attack. However, if or when you do happen upon a snake, here's how you should handle it, and here's a list of the snakes found in Louisiana that can potentially be dangerous.

"Living in south Louisiana the increase in rain brings out more of the slithering creatures," Hobby naturalist Alton Puckett says. "We will see a lot more snakes when there's water."

Snakes behave like most other animals that don't normally live in water. When the water rises and enters your house, you move to a higher area where there is less water. Plus, snakes that normally live in water have more area to live as the water levels rise.

If you encounter a snake, your first thought might be to go after the snake with whatever yard tool you have handy, but it is not recommended. In fact, the vast majority of bites from snakes occur when they are being attacked by humans. Instead, if you happen to observe a snake, Puckett recommends three basic rules:

"Step back, step away, get to a hospital."

So, what snakes do we have here in Acadiana that are dangerous?

CANEBRAKE RATTLESNAKE

Louisiana Department Of Wildlife & Fisheries

COPPERHEAD

Louisiana Department Of Wildlife & Fisheries

COTTONMOUTH

Louisiana Department Of Wildlife & Fisheries

EASTERN DIAMONDBACK RATTLESNAKE

Louisiana Department Of Wildlife & Fisheries

HARLEQUIN CORAL SNAKE

Louisiana Department Of Wildlife & Fisheries

PYGMY RATTLESNAKE

Louisiana Department Of Wildlife & Fisheries

TEXAS CORAL SNAKE 

Louisiana Department Of Wildlife & Fisheries