An independent poll shows Governor Edwards’ support has slipped and is now within the margin of error for potentially having to go into a run-off.

Edwards sits at 52 percent in the latest survey from Verne Kennedy. UL Lafayette Poli Sci Professor Pearson Cross says that’s dangerously close to a highly unpredictable run-off scenario.

“Edwards was in a stronger position a couple of weeks ago before some ads form a couple of his opponents took place. He’s dropped about six points overall.”

Edwards’ favorability rating dropped from 52 percent in April to 45 percent when the poll was conducted two weeks ago.

On the Republican side of the race, it looks like Eddie Rispone’s ad blitz has paid off. Cross says He’s at 19 percent, just six points shy of GOP frontrunner Congressman Abraham.

“While his ads were initially ridiculed by some because of their reliance and focus on Donald Trump and Trump’s policies, it appears to be paying off with a portion of the electorate.”

The pollster estimates Rispone has risen 12 points since his April survey.

The Congressman had an early name recognition advantage and has piled upstate GOP endorsements, but Cross says if he wants to hold off Rispone and make a run-off, he needs to run more ads. “Congressman Abraham has to be looking around now for additional funding sources, or hoping some outside sources come in and fund his campaign because the threat from Eddie Rispone is a real one.”

Abraham still fares about two points better than Rispone in a hypothetical run-off, but both candidates at this point still would fail to unseat the Governor.

Kennedy’s poll involves a substantial amount of voter redistribution. Voters who said they were undecided were assigned a candidate based on the demographics of those who had made up their minds. Black voters were heavy redistributed, only 54 percent said they supported the Governor, but the poll readjusted that number to an anticipated 90 percent on voting day. Four percent was leftover for anticipated levels of support for non-major candidates on the governor’s ballot.