A resident of Himbola Manor in Lafayette is warning other residents after her apartment ceiling caved in not once but twice.

The woman told KADN News 15, ceilings in the Himbola Manor apartment complex are not safe. When she first moved in she thought the complex was "well put together". But this summer her ceiling caved in causing extensive damage to the apartment and her belongings as well.

I don't know what the ceiling was made of...it just landed on everything. It kind of just fell. I heard when it fell. I seen when it fell. You know it was the wood, like the cushion and stuff on the inside of the ceiling.-Resident of Himbola Manor to KADN News 15

It started with a small dent in the living room. At the time the resident, "didn't think much of it."

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After a bad storm, the ceiling collapsed, causing over $5000 in damages to items in the apartment.

The leasing company agreed to repair the ceiling and did indeed make the necessary repairs, but just two months later, the ceiling collapsed again. This time on top of the woman's 2-year-old daughter.

I heard like a thump but I thought that she knocked something over and she was crying because she knocked it over...I got up anyway because her scream was a little too loud. Resident of Himbola Manor to KADN News 15

The tenant has moved out of Himbola Manor and took to social media to warn other tenants of the building's problems. She hopes the building's owner do a better job maintaining the building in the future, "Remodel it, knock it down, build it back up", she added.

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Himbola is not the place to lay your head. You'll never know when the roof coming down. -Resident of Himbola Manor

The apartment complex is located at 804 Martin Luther King Jr Dr, Lafayette, LA 70501. Himbola Manor's management has not commented publicly on the situation. 

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