Louisiana's John Kennedy says that it's time for West Virginia Senator Joe Manchin to switch parties and give control of the Senate to the Republicans.

Democrat Manchin's opposition to President Joe Biden's multi-trillion dollar Build Back Better bill was the proposed legislation's death knell and sparked more speculation that the West Virginian was once again considering a change of political affiliation.

Kennedy says that it's his thought that Manchin isn't the sole Dem against the bill, but  the only one public with his opposition. "It's not just Senator Manchin," Kennedy says, "I think there are four or five other Democrats in the Senate who are very queasy, very unsettled about this bill. They realize...we can barely afford the 126 welfare programs we have now."

"I haven't talked to him. I've exchanged texts with him. But Senator Manchin is not in any position to make any concessions right now. He's made it very clear. Joe didn't want this bill. He doesn't believe in it. His people back home don't like it."

Then the state's junior Senator addresses the possibility of a Manchin party switch. "I don't think (Manchin) will switch. I hope I'm wrong," Kennedy continues, "If he did make a switch, I think he's more likely to switch to Independent and then we would try to convince him to caucus...with us.

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"I think Senator Manchin would be more comfortable with the Republicans caucus than the Democratic caucus. I hear it from constituents all the time. They say, "You know, Republicans aren't perfect, but the other side is crazy now. Not all of them, but many of them."

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