The U.S. State Department has issued its first U.S. passport where a U.S. citizen used the new gender marker "X", signifying a person who identifies as nonbinary, intersex and gender non-conforming.

The Biden administration held true to their promise to the LGBTQ+ community by making those who don't identify with a particular gender, a legitimate group and class in this country.

The U.S. State Department will be able to offer the category "X" as an option on all official U.S. passports in the first quarter of 2022.

The Department has issued the first U.S. passport with an X gender marker.  We look forward to offering this option to all routine passport applicants once we complete the required system and form updates in early 2022.  We will provide updates and information on our website: travel.state.gov/gender. -State.gov

State Department spokesperson Ned Price said in a statement on Wednesday, it's about freedom and dignity.

I want to reiterate, on the occasion of this passport issuance, the Department of State's commitment to promoting the freedom, dignity, and equality of all people – including LGBTQI+ persons. -State Department Spokesperson Ned Price

Colorado resident Dana ZZyym, who identifies as intersex and nonbinary, sued the U.S. State Department siting issues about having to lie to get a passport. Zzyym told NPR, intersex and nonbinary persons couldn't be themselves.

It's great news for all intersex and nonbinary people because it basically says that we can get our passports. We don't have to lie to get our passports. We can just be ourselves. -Dana ZZyym to NPR

 

The U.S State Department will also start allowing applicants to select "M" or "Female" without providing any medical certification.

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