It was about a week ago as we were scrapping the last bits of dressing or pie or both off our plates and into our mouths that Christmas started to "blow up" across South Louisiana. For the most part, when it comes to holiday decorating those of us that live along I-10 don't mind waiting until Thanksgiving or even the day after to get started on our Christmas presentation.

But, when the time is right, we love to toss on the lights, hang up the mistletoe, and start looking for all of those rolls of wrapping paper we bought on sale after Christmas last year. If I may speak candidly to you, the wrapping of presents is always something that makes my blood pressure increase.

Eric Thayer/Getty Images
Eric Thayer/Getty Images
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I blame a lot of my present wrapping anxiety on peer pressure. A lot of the people in my family are really good with tape and scissors. I am a fat-fingered lefthanded male who once got an "unsatisfactory" grade in coloring because I had trouble staying in the lines. It wouldn't have been so bad except for the fact I was in college at the time.

In speaking with many of my male friend counterparts, they too share the anxiety of a perfectly presented present under the Christmas tree. Most guys have admitted they just use a gift bag, the shopping bag, or just wad some fancy paper around their package and hope for the best.

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But recently I discovered a simple and kind of different way to wrap the paper around packages. It still involves tape and a little bit of measuring but if you choose to wrap your packages using this method you won't have all that bunching on the ends and extra paper to wad up or fold over.

By the way, you can jump straight to the video presentation of this method just by scrolling down but I wanted to highlight a few of the moves first.

Todd Tripp via YouTube
Todd Tripp via YouTube
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The first thing I noticed is that the package is not set "square" inside the paper. It's diagonal. The gift wrapper starts by folding a corner over the package leaving it in a very non-traditional style.

Todd Tripp via YouTube
Todd Tripp via YouTube
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Next, the gift wrapper folds over another corner and secures both corners of the gift wrap with tape. As you can see, there certainly seems to be a lot of excess paper to deal with. But wait, the magic is about to happen.

Todd Tripp via YouTube
Todd Tripp via YouTube
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Hey, that's starting to look a lot better and most of the package is already concealed in gift wrap. All the gift wrapper has to do now is secure those final two corners and the present will be ready for a name tag.

Todd Tripp via YouTube
Todd Tripp via YouTube
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Okay, sorry for the blurry image, the gift wrappers hands are moving too fast. As you can see, she has tidied up all the corners and there is no unsightly bunching or wadding of paper on the ends. The package is completely concealed and it looks great.

Now, watch it unfold or fold, I guess I should say, in real-time.

This video was made in the Takashimaya Department Store, no, that's not near Cankton, it's in Japan and once again the Japanese have come up with a process that is pretty darn efficient. I hope the lady in the video got to eat plenty of Kentucky Fried Chicken for Christmas, that's also a Japanese thing.

Now that we have the presents wrapped, what time does Rudolph come on?

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